Everyone has their price porn

Phil Carroll from Shore Capital told BeverageDaily.com: “I’d never say never. Much as Heineken has pushed back there are ways around these things. Heineken wants to remain independent, but it doesn’t stop them [SAB] changing name, and Heineken having a family representation on the board.”

802.11n is certainly not dead and whilst manufacturers are still recommending 802.11n deployments, enterprise IT managers should give some thought to and make plans for the eventual implementation of 802.11ac. This white paper discusses how 802.11ac is being designed to meet the demands of clients in the future, help you understand the technology, what is likely to happen in the transition from 802.11n to ac and how you can get ready to meet these new demands.

Enterprise organisations are constantly being asked to do more work with fewer people, as the size and complexity of infrastructure and applications continue to grow unabated. This guide is intended for companies, organisations, and IT professionals who are looking for a network and application monitoring tool that provides a holistic view of application performance, including performance monitoring, from the end user perspective.

Section Editors
International:  Amelia Newcomb
National:  Mark Sappenfield
Deputy News Editor: Yvonne Zipp
Senior Economics Editor:  Laurent Belsie
Books & Rapid Response:  Marjorie Kehe
Op-Ed:  Clayton Jones
Europe & Canada:  Arthur Bright
Staff editor:  Christa Case Bryant  
Business Editor:  Schuyler Velasco
Passcode:  Michael Farrell

Harry Brunius , New York
Francine Kiefer , Washington
Peter Grier,  Washington
Linda Feldmann,  Washington Bureau Chief
Howard LaFranchi,  Washington
Warren Richey,  Washington
Anna Mulrine , Washington
Peter Ford,  Reporter at large
Scott Peterson,  Istanbul
Sara Miller Llana , Paris
Sara Sorcher , Washington
Cristina Maza , Budge Sperling Fellow, Washington
Jack Detsch , Mark Clayton Cybersecurity Fellow 
Henry Gass , Boston
Jessica Mendoza , Los Angeles
Josh Kenworthy , Boston

Online Editorial
Online Director:  David Clark Scott
Online News Editor:  Eoin O'Carroll
Staff Editor:  Kendra Nordin
Staff Editor: Molly Jackson
Social Media Coordinator:  Samantha Laine

Weekly Edition
Weekly Edition Editor:  Clayton Collins
Deputy Weekly Edition Editor:  Owen Thomas
Senior Editor:  Scott Armstrong
Multimedia Producer, Graphics Editor:  Jake Turcotte
Staff editor:  Judy Nichols Douglass

Nexus comes with the best Google apps pre-installed, so it's ready to use right out of the box. Search, Maps, Chrome, YouTube, Gmail, Drive, and so much more — ready for you to enjoy on your phone. And with Google Play Store you can access your favorite digital entertainment. Choose from millions of apps, books, songs, movies, and games.

Listen Listening... / 3:29 Credit Quinn Dombrowski/Flickr

Arber Tasimi,a graduate student at Yale’s infant cognition lab, spends a lot of time around that one group of people who should be pure and innocent, if anyone is. He and his colleagues showed a group of 64 babies two puppet shows. One starred a nice puppet who helped the other puppets get toys from a box. The other starred a mean puppet who slammed the box lid closed.

In the past, researchers showed babies preferred the nice puppet over the mean puppets if both offered the same number of crackers. But this is the first experiment to show that the more we’re getting out of the deal, the more we’re willing to, well, "forgive" the misdeeds of the giver.

We see people presented with this dilemma all the time. Tasimi gives an example from the HBO show The Sopranos, where mobster Tony Soprano’s wife Carmela loves the expensive gifts he gives her, while ignoring some of the bad things he does to be able to afford them.

"A common theme in this series is this conflict, this angst that she’s experiencing. Because really, on one hand, she wants to do good," Tasimi says. "She wants to punish Tony for the bad things that he does. But on the other hand, she also wants to do well."

Many are afraid that tackling climate change is going to be too costly. But increasingly, studies are showing action will not just be cheaper than inaction, but could actually result in economic, environmental and even health benefits, while improving sustainability.

The climate is changing. The earth is warming up, and there is now overwhelming scientific consensus that it is happening, and human-induced. With global warming on the increase and species and their habitats on the decrease, chances for ecosystems to adapt naturally are diminishing.

Thousands of people have died and many are at risk as the fatality rate from this virus is very high. As the crisis worsens, as well as the enormous health challenges involved, the social and economic consequences may set these countries back, reversing some gains a number of these countries have made in recent years.

The poorest people will also have less access to health, education and other services. Problems of hunger, malnutrition and disease afflict the poorest in society. The poorest are also typically marginalized from society and have little representation or voice in public and political debates, making it even harder to escape poverty.

By contrast, the wealthier you are, the more likely you are to benefit from economic or political policies. The amount the world spends on military, financial bailouts and other areas that benefit the wealthy, compared to the amount spent to address the daily crisis of poverty and related problems are often staggering.

Bunker cites a July 2015 survey by Clearswift which found that 35 percent of employees would give away company information for money. 25 percent of employees would sell company data for less than $8000 and 35 percent of employees were open to bribes at $77,500.

"The final piece is that once you’ve figured out what you’re doing with the people, you can look at putting in the technology. The technology is there to back up policy and people, to stop silly mistakes and stop malicious actors getting stuff out."

"You can just throw technology at the problem, but then people will work around it. People will find they cannot send things through Gmail and copy it to a USB stick instead. You can spend a lot of money and end up with more problems than you had in the first place."

"Clearswift’s solution looks for critical information if you try to send it out through email and anything you’re uploading or downloading over the web. It will also look for any critical information situated on your end-point, and if you are trying to copy it onto a USB, CD or DVD (if you happen to be Edward Snowden) and prevent you from doing so."

De Beers proved to be the most successful cartel arrangement in the annals of modern commerce. While other commodities, such as gold, silver, copper, rubber, and grains, fluctuated wildly in response to economic conditions, diamonds have continued, with few exceptions, to advance upward in price every year since the Depression. Indeed, the cartel seemed so superbly in control of prices -- and unassailable -- that, in the late 1970s, even speculators began buying diamonds as a guard against the vagaries of inflation and recession.

The diamond invention is far more than a monopoly for fixing diamond prices; it is a mechanism for converting tiny crystals of carbon into universally recognized tokens of wealth, power, and romance. To achieve this goal, De Beers had to control demand as well as supply. Both women and men had to be made to perceive diamonds not as marketable precious stones but as an inseparable part of courtship and married life. To stabilize the market, De Beers had to endow these stones with a sentiment that would inhibit the public from ever reselling them. The illusion had to be created that diamonds were forever -- "forever" in the sense that they should never be resold.

In September of 1938, Harry Oppenheimer, son of the founder of De Beers and then twenty-nine, traveled from Johannesburg to New York City, to meet with Gerold M. Lauck, the president of N. W. Ayer, a leading advertising agency in the United States. Lauck and N. W. Ayer had been recommended to Oppenheimer by the Morgan Bank, which had helped his father consolidate the De Beers financial empire. His bankers were concerned about the price of diamonds, which had declined worldwide.

Oppenheimer suggested to Lauck that his agency prepare a plan for creating a new image for diamonds among Americans. He assured Lauck that De Beers had not called on any other American advertising agency with this proposal, and that if the plan met with his father's approval, N. W. Ayer would be the exclusive agents for the placement of newspaper and radio advertisements in the United States. Oppenheimer agreed to underwrite the costs of the research necessary for developing the campaign. Lauck instantly accepted the offer.

In their subsequent investigation of the American diamond market, the staff of N. W. Ayer found that since the end of World War I, in 1919, the total amount of diamonds sold in America, measured in carats, had declined by 50 percent; at the same time, the quality of the diamonds, measured in dollar value, had declined by nearly 100 percent. An Ayer memo concluded that the depressed state of the market for diamonds was "the result of the economy, changes in social attitudes and the promotion of competitive luxuries."

They were outside Plaza Vista School in Irvine, where she had watched her daughter go from kindergarten to fifth grade, where any minute now the girl would be getting out of class to look for her. Parents had entrusted their own kids to Peters for years; she was the school’s PTA president and the heart of its after-school program.

Now she watched as her ruin seemed to unfold before her. Watched as the cop emerged from her car holding a Ziploc bag of marijuana, 17 grams worth, plus a ceramic pot pipe, plus two smaller EZY Dose Pill Pouch baggies, one with 11 Percocet pills, another with 29 Vicodin. It was enough to send her to jail, and more than enough to destroy her name.

She was 49, with short blond hair and a slightly bohemian air. As the volunteer director of the Afterschool Classroom Enrichment program at Plaza Vista, she was a constant presence on campus, whirling down the halls in flip-flops and bright sundresses, a peace-sign pendant hanging from her neck.

If she had time between tasks, she might slip into the cartooning class to watch her 10-year-old daughter, Sydnie, as she drew. Her daughter had been her excuse to quit a high-pressure job in the mortgage industry peddling loans, which she had come to associate with the burn of acid reflux.

Peters had spent her childhood in horse country at the foot of the San Gabriel Mountains. She tossed pizzas, turned a wrench in a skate shop, flew to Hawaii on impulse and stayed for two years. She mixed mai tais at a Newport Beach rib joint. She waited tables at a rock-n-roll-themed pasta house. A married lawyer — one of the regulars — grew infatuated with her and showed up at her house one night. He went away, but a sense of vulnerability lingered.

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Section Editors
International:  Amelia Newcomb
National:  Mark Sappenfield
Deputy News Editor: Yvonne Zipp
Senior Economics Editor:  Laurent Belsie
Books & Rapid Response:  Marjorie Kehe
Op-Ed:  Clayton Jones
Europe & Canada:  Arthur Bright
Staff editor:  Christa Case Bryant  
Business Editor:  Schuyler Velasco
Passcode:  Michael Farrell

Harry Brunius , New York
Francine Kiefer , Washington
Peter Grier,  Washington
Linda Feldmann,  Washington Bureau Chief
Howard LaFranchi,  Washington
Warren Richey,  Washington
Anna Mulrine , Washington
Peter Ford,  Reporter at large
Scott Peterson,  Istanbul
Sara Miller Llana , Paris
Sara Sorcher , Washington
Cristina Maza , Budge Sperling Fellow, Washington
Jack Detsch , Mark Clayton Cybersecurity Fellow 
Henry Gass , Boston
Jessica Mendoza , Los Angeles
Josh Kenworthy , Boston

Online Editorial
Online Director:  David Clark Scott
Online News Editor:  Eoin O'Carroll
Staff Editor:  Kendra Nordin
Staff Editor: Molly Jackson
Social Media Coordinator:  Samantha Laine

Weekly Edition
Weekly Edition Editor:  Clayton Collins
Deputy Weekly Edition Editor:  Owen Thomas
Senior Editor:  Scott Armstrong
Multimedia Producer, Graphics Editor:  Jake Turcotte
Staff editor:  Judy Nichols Douglass